Note: registration type is cited at the end of workshop title.

Sunday Workshops
Monday Workshops
Tuesday Workshops
Wednesday Workshops
Thursday Workshops
Friday Workshops

Sunday, 21 February

Best Practices in Mentoring (Open to All)

9:00 A.M.  – 12:00 P.M.
Room 211-213

This workshop will explore best practices for establishing and maintaining effective mentoring relationships. Good mentoring includes advising high school, undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral research, guiding early career scientists, broadening participation in Ocean Science, and establishing a network of productive colleagues. Participants will share best practices across a wide variety of mentoring situations, explore strategies to address a diversity of mentoring scenarios, and dig deeply into personal experiences to uncover both productive and non-productive mentoring situations. Come join us for an energetic workshop that will help you use mentoring to improve your success in the ocean sciences and become a better mentor. Lunch will be provided for participants of both Best Practices in Mentoring and Ocean Science Education and Outreach Workshops.

Connection Workshop I (No fee: Registration via Email Required)

10:00 A.M. – 1:00 P.M.
Room 220-221

A workshop to help improve communications skills so you can present your work more effectively.  Narrative structure is at the core of virtually all effective broad communication.  Scientist-turned-filmmaker Randy Olson has developed an approach he calls ‘critical storytelling,’ bringing together the broadly creative energy of Hollywood with the rigorous discipline and commitment to accuracy of the science world. He, and Hollywood colleagues, have offered workshops at recent Ocean Sciences and ASLO Aquatic Sciences meetings. The 3-hour workshop will feature the experienced communication specialist, Brian Palermo (an actor in many Hollywood movies and TV series and alumnus from the premier Improv theater in Los Angeles, The Groundlings). Participation in one of the Connection workshop sessions will be limited and prior registration will be required (no fee). To register, contact: jsharp@udel.edu.

Early Career Workshop: Reviewing proposals and manuscripts the good the bad and the ugly, led by Julie Kellner (NSF) and Adina Paytan, (Marine Chemistry and G3) (free pre-registration)

9:00 A.M. – 10:30 A.M.
Room 228-230

Reviewing research proposals and manuscripts is an important component of a researcher’s work. A reviewer’s verdicts on articles, research proposals and grant applications can have serious consequences. It is important, therefore, that these appraisals show high technical quality, respect and independence. The ownership of ideas and confidentiality should always be safeguarded. This workshop discusses the principles and procedures of reviewing other researchers’ grant proposals and manuscripts, how you can benefit from the process and the positive and negative impacts on your career.

Early Career Workshop: The secrets of publishing your article in international journals, led by Roger Harris (JPR), Robert Warren Howarth (EIC, L&O) and Karen Heywood (JPO) (free pre-registration)

9:00 A.M. -10:30 A.M.
Room 225-227

The editorial and review processes along the road to publication are described in general terms. The construction of a well-prepared article and the manner in which authors may maximize the chances of success at each stage of the process towards final publication are explored. The most common errors and ways of avoiding them are outlined. Typical problems facing an author writing in English, especially as a second language, including the need for grammatical precision and appropriate style, are discussed. Additionally, the meaning of plagiarism, self-plagiarism and duplicate publication is explored. Critical steps in manuscript preparation and response to reviews are examined. Finally, the relation between writing and reviewing is outlined, and it is indicated how becoming a good reviewer helps in becoming a successful author.

South Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (SAMOC) VI Workshop (Open to All)

9:00 A.M. – 6:00 P.M.
Room 217-219

SAMOC is an international CLIVAR-endorsed initiative to improve understanding of a key ocean dynamical system: the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and its variability and impacts in the South Atlantic.  This meeting will be the sixth interannual workshop bringing together experts from Argentina, Brazil, France, South Africa, the United States, and beyond to discuss recent advances and future collaborations for field work and model studies.  This SAMOC VI workshop will focus primarily on logistics, cruise planning, student research, proposal planning, and coordination of joint data analyses.  The workshop dovetails with one of the Ocean Science session: PO018 – Observing and Modeling the Meridional Overturning Circulation in the South Atlantic: Causes of variability and impacts on climate, weather, and ecosystems.  (Note: Invited talks only.)

Early Career Workshop: Getting your first academic job – Putting together an application and getting through the interview process, Led by Jim Yoder (WHOI) and Holly Moeller (WHOI) (free pre-registration)

11:00 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.
Room 228-230

The session will discuss the application process including the importance of carefully researching every position for which you apply including: modifying CVs, research and teaching statements to be appropriate for each position; what to expect at various stages in the interview process; and how to prepare oneself to negotiate a possible job offer when interviewing as a short, short list candidate. We hope that participants will share their recent interview experiences as part of the discussion.

Early Career Workshop: Open Panel Discussion: Navigating the first few years from accepting a position to your first pre-tenure merit evaluations (free pre-registration)

11:00 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.
Room 225-227

Please join in a confidential discussion with a panel of early (pre-tenure) and mid career (tenured within the last 3 years), and seasoned scientists from a range of academic institutions and industry. We will discuss a variety of topics including how to: negotiate your ‘start up’, avoid ‘space wars’, manage your time, recruit new students, make new collaborations inside/outside of your department, say no, etc.  All discussions will be confidential. Participants are encouraged to email questions or specific topics for discussion to Rachel Foster (Rachel.foster@su.se) and Olivia U. Mason (omason@fsu.edu) ahead of the panel discussion with PANEL 2016 in the subject. Participating in the open panel are Drs. Deborah Bronk and Deborah Steinberg, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, Gordon Taylor and Mary Scranton, Stony Brook University, Bethany Jenkins, University of Rhode Island, William Landing and Mike Stukel, Florida State University, Katherine Mackey, University of California, Irvine, Solange Duhamel, Columbia University and Tatiana Rynearson, University of Rhode Island.  Panel moderators are Rachel A. Foster and Olivia U. Mason.

Share Science in Your Community Workshop (Application Required)

11:15 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Room 223

At this interactive workshop, you will learn how to communicate science to people in your community in a relevant, engaging, and memorable way. You will learn how to identify the right group for you to reach out to, how to create an effective message about your research/work, and how to tailor your presentation for a specific audience. You will also learn critical listening skills, have the chance to practice public speaking, and receive feedback from communications experts and your peers. Apply now!

Connection Workshop II (No fee: Registration via Email Required)

2:00 P.M.  – 5:00 P.M.
Room 220-221

A workshop to help improve communications skills so you can present your work more effectively.  Narrative structure is at the core of virtually all effective broad communication.  Scientist-turned-filmmaker Randy Olson has developed an approach he calls ‘critical storytelling,’ bringing together the broadly creative energy of Hollywood with the rigorous discipline and commitment to accuracy of the science world. He, and Hollywood colleagues, have offered workshops at recent Ocean Sciences and ASLO Aquatic Sciences meetings. The 3-hour workshop will feature the experienced communication specialist, Brian Palermo (an actor in many Hollywood movies and TV series and alumnus from the premier Improv theater in Los Angeles, The Groundlings). Participation in one of the Connection workshop sessions will be limited and prior registration will be required (no fee). To register, contact: jsharp@udel.edu.

Early Career Workshop: How Learning Works: Useful Techniques for Future Teachers, led by Catherine Halversen LHS UCB (free pre-registration)

2:00 P.M. – 3:30 P.M.
Room 228-230

Drawing upon new research in psychology, education, and cognitive science, we will demystify a complex topic into clear explanations of powerful learning principles. Ideas and practical suggestions, all based on solid research evidence, will be presented in this workshop. We will discuss the use and usefulness of  evidence-based instructional strategies; describe three important ways that experts differ from novices; and, discuss lesson planning and student motivation with your peers.

Early Career Workshop: The art of teaching, led by Frederick Bingham (free pre-registration)

2:00 P.M. – 3:30 P.M.
Room 225-227

Teaching, when done right, can be a fun, rewarding and career-enhancing activity. Unfortunately, many graduate students and early career academics are thrown into the classroom with little guidance. The key to weaving teaching into your career is to minimize the time spent doing it, while maximizing your effectiveness. This workshop will give you practical advice for teaching, especially at the undergraduate level, from someone who has been doing it for over 20 years. Topics to be covered include: creating a syllabus and schedule, learning management systems (moodle, webAssign, Blackboard, etc.), choosing a textbook, dealing with problem students, motivating student achievement, different teaching styles (e.g. lecture, flipped classroom), student evaluation, grading, etc. Workshop participants will have time to share their ideas and experience and discuss their individual situation with each other and the workshop leader.

Exploring successful strategies for improving the preparation of 2YC students for ocean science careers (Open to All)

2:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Room 211-213

This workshop, designed for community college faculty, will explore successful strategies for improving the preparation of 2YC students for ocean science careers.   The workshop leaders and participants will: Identify and document the challenges in preparing 2YC students for ocean science careers and discuss strategies for addressing them. Explore successful strategies for improving the preparation of 2YC students for ocean science careers and degrees. Disseminate information on programs, activities, and resources that support the preparation of 2YC students for ocean science careers Expand the network of people interested in promoting and supporting the career preparation of 2YC ocean science students.

Ocean Science Education and Outreach: Broadening the Reach of Your Science (Open to All)

2:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Room 231-232

This workshop will focus on helping participants develop ideas for effective education and outreach activities. Featuring active, hands-on learning, small group discussions, and guided inquiry, this workshop will include short presentations on exemplary projects in formal and informal education designed for K-12, undergraduate, graduate, and public audiences to stimulate ideas.  Discussions of how people learn, how to assess the effectiveness of outreach activities, and how to develop projects that meet specific goals will help support project development. Participants are welcome to bring ideas that they would like to develop and share, and for which they would like to receive feedback.

Mentor/Mentee Meet-Up (pre-registration)

4:00 P.M. – 6:00 P.M.
Room R04

ASLO Multicultural Program: The Ocean Sciences Meeting Student Mentoring Program is separate from the ASLO Multicultural Program (ASLOMP), which also takes place at the Ocean Sciences Meeting and has a mentoring component. ASLO will run its 27th annual ASLOMP at OSM, aimed at building diversity in the field.  An important feature of ASLOMP is pairing students with meeting mentors. Mentors must be available to meet their mentees on Sunday, 21 February at 4:00 P.M.  Mentors will also meet with their students at least once every day of the meeting.  ASLOMP mentors must have a doctorate; prospective mentors should send a 2-page CV to Dr. Ben Cuker at cuker@hamptonu.edu.

Early Career Workshop: A primer to proposal writing, merit review and research funding, led by Eric Itsweire, (NSF) and Paula Bontempi, (NASA) (free pre-registration)

4:00 P.M. – 5:30 P.M.
Room 225-227

This workshop will cover the various factors that come into play to develop a great idea into a funded project: Should I do it alone or seek collaborators? Which agency and/or program(s) might be the best home for my proposal? Who is the audience for my proposal: experts in the field, the larger scientific community, the funding agency’s program managers? How do I structure my proposal to get my message across effectively? How are funding decision made? Examples for several U.S. funding agencies will be discussed and ample time will be reserved for questions and answers. Participants who would like more detailed information about a specific research program or funding agency are encouraged to sign up for one of the breakfast meetings with U.S. funding agencies’ program managers later in the week.

Early Career Workshop: Early Career Funding Opportunities in Europe, coordinated by Susanne Menden-Deuer (URI). Panelists include Pere Masqué, (Autonomous University Barcelona), Monika Rhein (Universität Bremen) and TBA (free pre-registration)

4:00 P.M. – 5:30 P.M.
Room 228-230

The European research environment provides particular opportunities and challenges for early career scientists. In this panel-led discussion, diverse researchers will share their advice and experiences on navigating the European funding landscape. The discussion will address opportunities to obtain both research funding and salary/stipend support and address challenges of both national and transnational funding agencies. We aim for an interactive event and participants are encouraged to share their questions and advice.

Monday, 22 February

Physical Samples in Ocean Sciences: A Forum Hosted Jointly by EarthCube CReSCyNT and iSamples Research Coordination Networks, and SeaView Integrative Activity (Open to All)

12:30 P.M. – 2:00 P.M.
Room 201-202

This event, hosted by the EarthCube iSamples and CReSCyNT Research Coordination Networks and the SeaView Integrative Activity will provide an opportunity for you to: learn about these organizations and how they support digital and physical sample management, sample citation in publications, and more, tell us about the challenges you encounter with your sample collections, their curation, documentation, and preservation, check out existing tools that can help you manage your samples.

ASLO Editors and Wiley Demonstration Forum (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. – 2:00 P.M.
Room 203-205

Join President Jim Elser and all the ASLO Publication Editors for an open forum on new developments within their respective publications, and a discussion of editorial objectives and future plans. An open question and answer session will follow. Representatives of Wiley, ASLO’s publishing partner, will demonstrate and discuss the enhancements and benefits from the migration of journal content to Wiley Online Library.  Refreshments and boxed lunches will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Contact Teresa Curto (execdir@aslo.org) for more information.

Techniques for Decoding Your Science and Overcoming Bottlenecks in Student Learning (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. -1:45 P.M.
Room 208-209

This workshop is sponsored by the NSF sponsored Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE). Effective communication and engagement with members of the public from underrepresented groups hinges on effective mentorship and cultural competency on the part of faculty, staff and mentors. In this workshop, we will provide scientists with training in culturally responsive communication strategies, which builds from the assumption that audience members may come with a set of beliefs, skills, and understandings that can be grounded within their personal cultural experiences. This workshop will focus on recognizing and making connections to the diverse cultural values of our target audiences using multiple ways of viewing, structuring, and transmitting scientific content as it relates to enhancing our knowledge of the world.

Tuesday, 23 February

Ocean Sciences Journalist for a Day Mini-Workshop (Invitation Required)

7:30 A.M. – 7:45 A.M.
Location to Be Determined

Looking to win a Pulitzer in your future?   ASLO and NSF are hosting a mini-workshop for up to 10 attendees to sharpen their reporting and writing skills.  Mentors Adrienne Sponberg (ASLO Director of Communications and Science) and Cheryl Dybas (NSF Senior Science Writer) will work with participants before, during, and after the conference to produce a summary of a scientific session for publication in the L&O Bulletin.   Through this unique opportunity, you will learn the basics of good science journalism, which is all about storytelling.  By reporting and writing about research other than your own, as a journalist would, and in the constraints of a 500-to-800-word piece, you will learn some of the tricks of the trade, in the process becoming a better writer.    Good writing skills are important in every facet of science: from relating to colleagues and peer-reviewers to communicating with the general public.  Interested applicants should send the following materials to Sponberg@aslo.org and cdybas@nsf.gov by December 1:    Brief statement of interest, along with a short bio;  List of three OSM sessions you would be interested in writing about (please use session number and title; search by topic at https://agu.confex.com/agu/os16/preliminaryview.cgi/programs.html) and one writing sample. The sample does not need to have been published before, but should be in non-technical writing style.

Connecting with Diverse Audiences (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. – 1:45 P.M.
Room 208-209

This workshop is sponsored by the NSF sponsored Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE). Effective communication and engagement with members of the public from underrepresented groups hinges on effective mentorship and cultural competency on the part of faculty, staff and mentors. In this workshop, we will provide scientists with training in culturally responsive communication strategies, which builds from the assumption that audience members may come with a set of beliefs, skills, and understandings that can be grounded within their personal cultural experiences. This workshop will focus on recognizing and making connections to the diverse cultural values of our target audiences using multiple ways of viewing, structuring, and transmitting scientific content as it relates to enhancing our knowledge of the world.

Undergraduate Research Mentoring Panel (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. – 1:45 P.M.
Room 203-205

Independent undergraduate research projects are often powerful experiences that attract a diverse set of student to pursue advanced degrees in ocean science.  Please join our discussion with undergraduates and an expert panel of experienced and accomplished undergraduate mentors. We will learn both the undergraduate and experienced mentor perspectives on what works in recruiting, advising, and following up with undergraduates to ensure a positive, rewarding research experience. Mentors will include Claudia Benitez-Nelson (University of South Carolina; Research I), Kim Frashure (Bunker Hill Community College; 2 year college), and Ben Cuker (Hampton University; 4 year college).

Snap-It-Up Workshop (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. – 1:45 P.M.
Room 215-216

You can make a narrow presentation at a meeting that is fine for a small number of your specialty peers.  However, since Oceanography is a multi-disciplinary science, you need a broader approach to be interesting also to those outside your field. This workshop will feature Hollywood actor and acting instructor, Brian Palermo, assisted by Jonathan Sharp (University of Delaware), and Adrienne Sponberg (ASLO). They will attend several presentations, then comment on them addressing techniques and approaches to make presentations more exciting and appealing to those outside your specialty as well as more effective to those within your specialty. As in previous renditions of the workshop, presenters of the papers will agree to be evaluated and be present to discuss the comments and suggestions.

 

Wednesday, 24 February

Agency Breakfast  (Registration Required)

6:45 A.M. – 7:45 A.M.
Rivergate Room

This is a chance to meet with program managers from federal funding agencies or private foundations and have an informal conversation about careers, funding, writing and reviewing proposals or any other topic that comes up. Participants will be asked to fill out a survey indicating the agencies or programs they are interested in, and groups of 3-4 participants will be assigned to meet with a particular program manager over a simple continental breakfast.  Registration is free but strictly required because of limited capacity. Participation is limited to early career scientists and students close to completing their degrees and one event per person.

Exploring Careers Outside of Academia (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. – 1:45 P.M.
Room 208-209

Come and explore the world outside of academia at a panel discussion designed for the graduate student or postdoc considering all his or her options. At this workshop, you will hear from people who have successfully leveraged their graduate school experiences in order to transition into a wide range of careers. Panelists will come from backgrounds ranging from science writing and policy, to government and non-profits. They will share their experiences and then we will open up the floor for a Q&A. Panelists will also be available at the student section of the Exhibit Hall that evening to continue discussions about these topics.

Getting people to hang on (almost) every word: Telling stories about your science (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. – 1:45 P.M.
Room 203-205

This workshop will be led by science reporter Ari Daniel.  We are all made up of stories.  They are the currency of communication and memory.  In this workshop, you will learn how to take your science — and the way you usually present data and research — and frame it inside of a story.  Humorous stories that make people smile, meaningful stories that make your listener care, and engaging stories that stimulate interest in you science.  You’ll hear some examples, and get to try it yourself.  Ari is a science journalist, and contributes radio and video stories to public radio outlets, NOVA, and other non-profit and academic institutions.  Lunch will be provided to the first 50 participants.  This workshop is brought to you by: ASLO Outreach Committee and Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE).

Satellite & In Situ Salinity (SISS) Working Group Meeting (Open to All)

6:15 P.M. – 10:15 P.M.
Room 223

The major goal of this working group is to improve our understanding of the link between L-band satellite (SMOS, Aquarius, SMAP) salinity (for approximately the top 1 cm of the sea surface) and in situ measured salinity (routinely measured at a few meters depths by ships and ARGO floats but recently accessible to up to few cm depth by new profilers, and by surface drifters …) (see a white paper onto http://siss.locean-ipsl.upmc.fr/documents/ARTICLES/BAMS_Salinity_v171115f.pdf). This working group meeting will be dedicated to the development of practical methodologies for relating and validating satellite salinity with other estimates of sea surface salinity.

2nd Workshop on Environmental Controls of marine N2 fixation:  Present Knowledge and Future Challenges (Invitation Required)

6:30 P.M. – 7:30 P.M.
Room 203-205

Bringing together a wide group of experts, from genomics to global biogeochemistry, working on Marine N2 Fixation, this 2nd 1-day round-table workshop (after a 1st workshop in Granada in February 2015) aims at consolidating current knowledge and define key uncertainties in current understanding of marine N2 fixation. The program will include; 1) Short overview presentations on the emergent knowledge gaps and the recent progress and actions undertaken; 2) Round-table discussion session to address future research priorities, make recommendations for observational and modeling programs, and prepare a roadmap for future collaborative research projects; 3) Short presentations on specific research topics to be addressed in a special issue in a peer-reviewed journal. Due to limited funding participation is by invitation only. Refreshments will be provided.

Thursday, 25 February

Agency Breakfast  (Registration Required)

6:45 A.M. – 7:45 A.M.
Rivergate Room

This is a chance to meet with program managers from federal funding agencies or private foundations and have an informal conversation about careers, funding, writing and reviewing proposals or any other topic that comes up. Participants will be asked to fill out a survey indicating the agencies or programs they are interested in, and groups of 3-4 participants will be assigned to meet with a particular program manager over a simple continental breakfast.  Registration is free but strictly required because of limited capacity. Participation is limited to early career scientists and students close to completing their degrees and one event per person.

Workshop on transport mooring arrays in the Atlantic in the framework of the AtlantOS project (Invitation Required)

12:30 P.M. – 2:20 P.M.
Room 207

In the context of the EU funded project AtlantOS the realization of a one-stop-shop website for transport mooring arrays (TMAs) in the Atlantic will be discussed within this workshop. The website shall be a product of a strengthened TMA network.

Connecting with Diverse Audiences (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. – 1:45 P.M.
Room 203-205

Effective communication and engagement with members of the public from underrepresented groups hinges on effective mentorship and cultural competency on the part of faculty, staff and mentors. In this workshop, we will provide scientists with training in culturally responsive communication strategies, which builds from the assumption that audience members may come with a set of beliefs, skills, and understandings that can be grounded within their personal cultural experiences. This workshop will focus on recognizing and making connections to the diverse cultural values of our target audiences using multiple ways of viewing, structuring, and transmitting scientific content as it relates to enhancing our knowledge of the world.

Teaching Introductory Ocean and Environmental Sciences (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. – 1:45 P.M.
Room 215-216

Introductory environmental and ocean science courses provide an excellent opportunity to prepare both majors and non-majors for thinking about some of the largest issues facing society such as climate change and energy needs. Introductory courses can also serve to recruit students from highly diverse backgrounds into the field. Often, these courses are large (>50 students). This workshop will provide strategies to overcome some of the challenges of these large introductory courses while making your teaching engaging, relevant, and effective. Come ready to share ideas, to think actively about teaching and learning, and to discuss what works and why.

Win-Win Partnerships: Broader Impacts That Make a Difference (Open to All)

12:45 P.M. – 1:45 P.M.
Room 203-205

This workshop is sponsored by the NSF sponsored Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE). The NSF Criterion II/Broader Impact requirement challenges scientists to develop research and activities that benefit STEM education, the greater scientific community and society. Many polar and climate scientists have leveraged this requirement to create successful formal and informal science education collaborations, including K-12 programs and informal learning programs in science museum and science centers. In this session, we will explore a suite of new online resources for polar and climate scientists aimed at developing a BI statement that will satisfy NSF Criterion II and fulfill your interest in communicating your science. Learn about the important points to include in your BI statement and tips on engaging in effective partnerships, selecting potential audiences, and developing activities that achieve broader impacts.

Friday, 26 February

Agency Breakfast  (Registration Required)

6:45 A.M. – 7:45 A.M.
Rivergate Room

This is a chance to meet with program managers from federal funding agencies or private foundations and have an informal conversation about careers, funding, writing and reviewing proposals or any other topic that comes up. Participants will be asked to fill out a survey indicating the agencies or programs they are interested in, and groups of 3-4 participants will be assigned to meet with a particular program manager over a simple continental breakfast.  Registration is free but strictly required because of limited capacity. Participation is limited to early career scientists and students close to completing their degrees and one event per person.