By: Eric Anderson , NOAA Gregory Dusek , NOAA
You’ve heard of tsunamis – giant oceanic waves triggered primarily by earthquakes that can roll ashore, causing loss of life and disaster. But have you heard of meteotsunamis? These are large waves scientists are just beginning to better understand. They are known to occur in the Great Lakes, the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, the Adriatic Sea and off the coast of Australia. Unlike tsunamis triggered by seismic activity, meteotsunamis are driven by weather events such as fast-moving, severe thunderstorms. As scientists better understand this phenomenon and its effects, they are working to develop a reliable early warning system. In this briefing, researchers will discuss the state of meteotsunami science, the hazards they pose to coastal communities and scientists’ efforts to develop meteotsunami early warning systems in the Great Lakes and off the coastal United States. Participants: Philip Y. Chu, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A.; Eric J. Anderson, NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A.; Gregory Dusek, Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, NOAA National Ocean Service, Silver Spring, Maryland, U.S.A.; Chin H. Wu, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A.